Prejudice In Its Worst Form
During World War II, the most horrendous and cruel event in history occurred, the Holocaust. This was when people that Hitler did not like were "relocated" into a concentration camp. Adolf Hitler had concentration camps to practice genocide on the Jews and many other people. Genocide is the event in which someone tries to get rid of a religion. Some of the people that were "relocated" were Jehovah's witnesses, political prisoners, Jews, and gypsies. I have noticed that some parents are trying to decide whether sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust or should they not learn about the Holocaust. It is easy for me to decide that sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust for many different reasons. Sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust because they possess an acceptable level of maturity, they will learn not be prejudice, and they can prevent this from happening again.
One reason why I think that sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust is that sixth graders have already obtained a level of maturity that allows them to learn about the Holocaust. First of all, sixth graders must learn that the world is not a perfect place and telling them about the Holocaust is a perfect way to let them know that the world is not perfect. Secondly, kids must learn to face reality because if they don't it will be very arduous when they become adults. Another reason is that this is something that people must understand at a young age so that they will understand as they get older. If you don't tell sixth graders about this they might research it and learn all of the horrific things that the Nazis did to the Jews. Wouldn't it be better if kids were told the basics and were not shown the worst parts?
The second reason why sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust so that they will not be prejudice. Sixth graders will not be prejudice because they will become tolerant to all of the other religions. They will be tolerant because they will be used to the diversity. Also, by learning about the Holocaust kids will not be prejudice because they know of the consequence of being prejudice. Another thing is that not being prejudice is a good trait that will be obtained by learning about this event in history.
Lastly I think that learning about the Holocaust will prevent this from happening again. Firstly, it is a fact that if you don't learn from history it will repeat itself. For example, right now genocide is being practiced in North Korea, Bosnia, and in Iraq. Also, if we teach the next generation our children will be safe. Thirdly, if we do not teach our kids this stuff they could start things like World Wars and that would be terrible. Like my mom said, "I think that sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust because it will teach them about the discrimination of the killing of the Jews.. Also, it will teach them what not to do in the future."
Even though parents would argue that sixth graders should not learn about the Holocaust, this change will benefit the world. Some parents would disagree, but parents will soon get used to their kids learning about the Holocaust because most parents are coming to their senses and are agreeing tith the fact that sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust. Why should kids be expected to not be prejudiced if they don't know the consequence of being prejudice? For the sake of the world sixth graders should learn about the Holocaust.